Monday, September 25, 2017

Movie Reviews

Home Movie Reviews

Salt And Fire DVD Review

Take an ecological disaster, missing luggage and a tablet with possibly the longest battery life in the world, and what have you got?  The latest from auteur director Werner Herzog. Herzog’s career reaches its fiftieth anniversary next year: his first feature, Signs Of Life, was released in 1968.  During that time, he’s directed titles that frequently find their way onto...

Their Finest Review

Morale boosting movies for the home front, romance and a scene-stealing ham actor.  But do they turn Their Finest into British film making’s finest hour and a half? You’ll excuse the literary reference.  New release Their Finest is based on Lissa Evans’ book, Their Finest Hour And A Half, all about the efforts of the Ministry Of Information to make...

Fast and Furious 8 Review

The longevity and success of the Fast and Furious franchise tell you one thing, the studio and filmmakers certainly know their audience so why mess with something that works so darn well, Fast and Furious 8 with all its glorious flaws, cheese and complete insanity is ludicrously blistering entertainment. Faces have come and sadly gone from this series of films...

The Sense of an Ending Review

With a title such as The Sense of an Ending, big expectations lay ahead, not even the greatest performances can make up for less than satisfying ending, building to a crescendo which forever hovers in the air never making that crashing descent of closure it so truly needs. With a screenplay adapted from Julian Barnes prize-winning novel of the same...

The Hatton Garden Job Review

Described as the most spectacular British crime of this decade, the Hatton Garden heist surprisingly wasn’t just notorious for the theft of £14m of valuables, but perhaps more so because of the men behind the burglary. Experienced thieves, yes, but also pensioners. This somewhat bizarre crime scene has been brought to life in spoof flick, The Hatton Garden Job, where...

Aftermath Review

Arnie Schwarzenegger’s adventures in indieland continue this week with the arrival of Aftermath, based on the true story of a plane crash.  Are we about to see an Arnaissance? Now that he’s non-too-impressed with his proposed cameo in Shane Black’s Predator re-boot, Arnie Schwarzenegger may have some time on his hands - especially as Universal now appears to have shelved...

Going in Style Review

In Going In Style, a trio of A-list pensioners decide to rob a bank.  But can the film get away with it? There’s a moment in Zach Braff’s Going In Style where would-be bank robbers Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman and Alan Arkin are watching Dog Day Afternoon on TV.  It’s armchair research for them, but for the audience, it’s a...

A Quiet Passion Review

The last thing you would come to expect from a period biopic would be anything but quirky but Terence Davies, A Quiet Passion, the story of the 19th century American poet Emily Dickenson, revels in a slightly left of centre fascinating drama of a women trapped in an era that wasn’t quite ready for her individualism and feminine strength. If...

The Boss Baby Review

Most parents will probably tell you it’s the baby that’s the boss in their household, but just to make everyone sit up and take notice Trump impersonator, Alex Baldwin has joined his Madagascar cohort Tom McGrath to voice an animation which, considering its faults is better than you’d expect in The Boss Baby. It’s with no surprise, with babies and...

City of Tiny Lights Review

Based on the 2005 novel of the same name, author Patrick Neate brings modern-day noir City of Tiny Lights to the big screen with Dredd director Pete Travis at the helm, and hot commodity British star Riz Ahmed in the leading role as P.I.Tommy Akhtar. After a local escort visits him asking for his help, Tommy sets off on what...

Ghost in the Shell Review

Under tight wraps for months, Ghost In The Shell emerges into the daylight this week.  But does it give us an original take on the android theme, or something much more familiar? Clues that a film may not live up to the hype. Clue one: the film company don’t want any reviews to appear until the day it’s released. Clue...

Free Fire Review

British director Ben Wheatley has never shied away from controversy or dividing audiences.  Has he hit the target with his latest, Free Fire? Ben Wheatley likes his single locations.  First, there was a field (A Field In England), then a tower block (High-Rise) and now a disused warehouse in Free Fire, which was also the movie that closed the London...

Man Down Review

Headache inducing doesn’t give the right amount of credence to the complete and utter mess of Man Down. Man Down is a confusion infused collaboration between a leading man whose involvement seems unfathomably odd and a director whose direction seems to wander aimlessly looking for his purpose. With no coherent flow, Man Down follows Gabriel Drummer (Shia LaBeouf), a US Marine...

Don’t Knock Twice Review

It has become relatively normal to have low expectations for horror films. They’re the genre that suffers the most from an infamous lack of care and creativity. Luckily, this can lead to some grand surprises, but most of the time they end up being exactly what is anticipated. Don’t Knock Twice didn’t spark a feeling of promise based on its...

The Lost City of Z Review

Cerebral and oddly intoxicating James Gray’s adventure into one man’s life-long obsession for the Lost City of the Amazon he called Z, takes us on an almost trippy journey of British Explorer Percy Fawcett’s, at times, ridiculed and fateful mission to unearth his dream. The Lost City of Z is an adaptation of the novel from David Gann, but this...

Get Out Review

It’s not easy piecing together a thrilling horror which has very rarely been seen before, one that will have audiences beguiled by its mixture of humour, horror, political statements and a barrel load of suspense. Jordan Peele, in his directorial debut with Get Out, has broken out of his comedy corner and rustled up a dish of fresh, fun yet...

Beauty and the Beast Review

If there is one actress on this earth that has Disney princess screaming from her very being it’s Emma Watson, looking very much like the quintessential English rose with an enchanting demeanour and a 21st century twist there couldn’t be a better person to play Belle in Disney’s live-action Beauty and the Beast – even if her performance is...

Personal Shopper Review

When technology becomes a supporting role opposite Kristen Stewart in possible one of her best performances yet we get a thrilling, spooky and anxiety filled art-house classic that speaks directly to a modern society which could see a return to form for director Olivier Assayas. Personal Shopper isn’t a horror in the conventional sense but deals with the supernatural with...

Kong: Skull Island Review

Since 1933, the giant ape, Kong, has been the subject of at least seven movies either in an original storyline or via remakes including the last offering with Peter Jackson’s 2005 remake of the 1933 original, King Kong.  Whilst Jackson’s offering was not quite up to epic proportions, Kong: Skull Island only out ape’s it with its CGI battles...

Elle Review

Can you make a comedy about rape?  Controversial director Paul Verhoeven has, in the shape of Elle.  How much you laugh at it depends on your sense of humour. The screen is completely dark.  Then animalistic, rutting noises slowly emerge, sounds of pain.  People are having sex, but it doesn’t sound a pleasant experience and we soon realise why.  The...

Catfight Review

With a title such as Catfight, you would be forgiven for thinking you’re in for a saccharine, handbags at ten paces comedy of women with their perfectly manicured nails scratching each other’s eyes out over matters of extreme unimportance – this couldn’t be further from the mistitled vicious truth. Broken down into three role reversing chapters which come full circle...

I.T. Review

In a world that’s just seen a third series of technology horror anthology Black Mirror, it’s impossible not to compare thrillers with the same theme to the standard which the show has created, which is a test Pierce Brosnan-starring film I.T.  must also face. Despite the challenging circumstances, I.T is overall a surprisingly worthy action-thriller centred around the idea of...

Trespass Against US Review

Trespass Against Us directed by Adam Smith contrasts a familiar story with that of an unfamiliar setting – which breathes fresh life into a very recognizable crime story. A stellar cast that includes the likes of Michael Fassbender, Brendan Gleeson and Sean Harris enhances the composition of every scene considerably. As far as set-ups go, Trespass Against Us presents us with...

Logan Review

Are you sick and tired of the numerous superhero, superpower monopoly that is flooding the cinematic universe? Logan may very well be one of those aforementioned characters but the grisly, mean and moody Wolverine has hardly ever followed the conventional suit of the superhero. With Hugh Jackman delivering his last stand of the beloved Logan/Wolverine we get an X-Men spin-off...

A Cure for Wellness Review

Writhing eels, flotation tanks and something iffy in the water.  But is A Cure For Wellness a tonic or just another placebo? That blue bottle on the poster for Gore Verbinski’s A Cure For Wellness has a message.  And, with no apologies whatsoever to the legendary Monty Python sketch, that message is “beware”. The film starts off promisingly enough, with financial...

The Fits Review

After a warm reception at this year’s Sundance, The Fits gets a limited UK release this week.  Its story may sound familiar, but the way it’s told is anything but. Cast your mind back to the spring of last year and a film that caused something of a stir.  The Falling.  It was set in a late 60s girls’ school...

Bitter Harvest Review

When retelling important parts of world history we are almost, most certainly, presented with a slightly skewed version, one of bias, surrounding the truth of events that played out and always what we are lead to believe happened. Bitter Harvest, which centres around Joseph Stalin’s 1930’s ‘genocidal’ policies, is placed firmly into that mould. Part love story, part political hammering...

Best (George Best: All By Himself) Review

Over recent years the biographical documentary has been one of intrigue, emotion and nostalgia with never before seen footage of our subjects compiled so eloquently to keep audiences fully engrossed and interest heightened to rocket fuelled levels, but does Best (George Best: All By Himself) live up to the quality of Asif Kapadia’s Amy? The simple answer, No. There is...

Patriots Day Review

With 2017’s Deepwater Horizon, Director Peter Berg and Mark Wahlberg proved to be quite an explosive pair in their collaboration which brought to life the real life story of this drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico, with spectacular vision and creativity (and one of the biggest sets ever built) it was a truly mesmerising piece of cinema. Not even...

We Go On Review

As we become more spoilt with methods of watching films, the act of actually choosing anything to watch is quite unbearable. New streaming service Shudder aims to cut through the noise and reach those on the hunt for the best of a wide range of horror films, consisting of platform exclusives as well as general releases. Unable to see anywhere...

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