Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Movie Reviews

Home Movie Reviews

Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazar’s Revenge Review

The Pirates Of The Caribbean franchise reaches number five with Salazar’s Revenge.  But is it time for the ol’ heave-ho, me hearties? Hang on!  Wasn’t this supposed to be called Dead Men Tell No Tales?  Yes, it was, and it still is in the States – and the line’s included in the film – but, in their infinite wisdom, Disney...

Live By Night DVD Review

Ben Affleck’s rollercoaster career has hit the heights and plumbed the depths.  So where does his gangster flick, Live By Night, fit in? Related: The Films of Zoe Saldana Nearly five years ago, Ben Affleck was riding high on the success of his Iran hostage thriller, Argo.  It went down well with critics and audiences and there was more to come...

King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword Review

It’s unceremoniously tanked in the States, so what kind of reception can Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword expect as it arrives this week? Do you know your Uther Pendragons from your Mordred's?  If King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword is anything to go by, director Guy Ritchie certainly doesn’t.  Not that it’s prevented him from making his...

Alien: Covenant Review

Back in 2012 Ridley Scott ventured back into his Alien world with what was meant to be a prequel to the Alien franchise and left us feeling a little underwhelmed, five years on Scott is back at the helm with Alien: Covenant, a sequel to the aforementioned prequel which still falls before the first Alien film, injecting a much-needed...

Remembering The Man DVD Review

A real-life gay love story set in 80s Australia was one of the most moving cinematic experiences of last year.  But can a documentary about the same couple cause a spike in tissue sales?   Just under a year ago, cinema audiences clutched their tissues as they watched Holding The Man, the deeply moving true story of two gay Australians, Timothy...

Miss Sloane Review

In John Madden’s Miss Sloane it's implied women of high intellect, top of their game and always one step ahead of her male counterparts have to be a woman with the traits of a cold-hearted and arrogant trout, one that views sex as a treat and hires male escort’s to fulfil her sexual necessity, that, in a nutshell, is...

Mindhorn Review

From The Mighty Boosh to Mindhorn, Julian Barratt and Simon Farnaby team up yet again to both write and star in a tale of a once worshipped, now washed up 80’s actor Richard Thorncroft aka Mindhorn poking fun at the fame game with hilarious and pitiful sympathies. As you would expect from the Mighty Boosh duo, Mindhorn is an out...

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Review

The a-holes are back with a big bang of colour and euphoric family bickering that falters with a little whimper, riding the tails of the first in order to make Vol. 2 an eggtastic success with the scene-stealing baby Groot and an emotionally touching shocker that tugs lightly at the heart strings as well as taking you by surprise. If...

Lady Macbeth Review

Titles can be deceptive, despite the title here, Lady Macbeth isn’t the wife of Shakespeare’s tyrannical ruler who slowly delves deep into the realms of madness, however, this production is a cunning minx of murderously intoxicating drama, and utterly absorbing filmmaking at its finest. The true subject of this beguiling period piece is in fact director William Oldroyd and screenwriter...

The Promise Review

Irish screenwriter and director, Terry George is no stranger to adapting a real-life tragedy for a quietly epic cinematic experience. The Hotel Rwanda director, with The Promise, brings to life the atrocities the Armenian people faced at hands of the former Ottoman Empire only to dilute the story with a tragic and convoluted yet unconvincing love story. Let it be...

The Pyramid Texts Review

Stripped back and laid bare, the film adaptation of BAFTA award-winning writer Geoff Thompson’s stage play, The Pyramid Texts, is nothing less of a powerhouse of raw human emotion with an exceptional performance from its lone front man, James Cosmo. The Pyramid Texts is laced beautifully together with bouts of poetic dialogue that tear deep into a single man’s soul...

Salt And Fire DVD Review

Take an ecological disaster, missing luggage and a tablet with possibly the longest battery life in the world, and what have you got?  The latest from auteur director Werner Herzog. Herzog’s career reaches its fiftieth anniversary next year: his first feature, Signs Of Life, was released in 1968.  During that time, he’s directed titles that frequently find their way onto...

Their Finest Review

Morale boosting movies for the home front, romance and a scene-stealing ham actor.  But do they turn Their Finest into British film making’s finest hour and a half? You’ll excuse the literary reference.  New release Their Finest is based on Lissa Evans’ book, Their Finest Hour And A Half, all about the efforts of the Ministry Of Information to make...

Fast and Furious 8 Review

Fast and Furious

The longevity and success of the Fast and Furious franchise tell you one thing, the studio and filmmakers certainly know their audience so why mess with something that works so darn well, Fast and Furious 8 with all its glorious flaws, cheese and complete insanity is ludicrously blistering entertainment. Faces have come and sadly gone from this series of films...

The Sense of an Ending Review

With a title such as The Sense of an Ending, big expectations lay ahead, not even the greatest performances can make up for less than satisfying ending, building to a crescendo which forever hovers in the air never making that crashing descent of closure it so truly needs. With a screenplay adapted from Julian Barnes prize-winning novel of the same...

The Hatton Garden Job Review

Described as the most spectacular British crime of this decade, the Hatton Garden heist surprisingly wasn’t just notorious for the theft of £14m of valuables, but perhaps more so because of the men behind the burglary. Experienced thieves, yes, but also pensioners. This somewhat bizarre crime scene has been brought to life in spoof flick, The Hatton Garden Job, where...

Aftermath Review

Arnie Schwarzenegger’s adventures in indieland continue this week with the arrival of Aftermath, based on the true story of a plane crash.  Are we about to see an Arnaissance? Now that he’s non-too-impressed with his proposed cameo in Shane Black’s Predator re-boot, Arnie Schwarzenegger may have some time on his hands - especially as Universal now appears to have shelved...

Going in Style Review

In Going In Style, a trio of A-list pensioners decide to rob a bank.  But can the film get away with it? There’s a moment in Zach Braff’s Going In Style where would-be bank robbers Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman and Alan Arkin are watching Dog Day Afternoon on TV.  It’s armchair research for them, but for the audience, it’s a...

A Quiet Passion Review

The last thing you would come to expect from a period biopic would be anything but quirky but Terence Davies, A Quiet Passion, the story of the 19th century American poet Emily Dickenson, revels in a slightly left of centre fascinating drama of a women trapped in an era that wasn’t quite ready for her individualism and feminine strength. If...

The Boss Baby Review

Most parents will probably tell you it’s the baby that’s the boss in their household, but just to make everyone sit up and take notice Trump impersonator, Alex Baldwin has joined his Madagascar cohort Tom McGrath to voice an animation which, considering its faults is better than you’d expect in The Boss Baby. It’s with no surprise, with babies and...

City of Tiny Lights Review

Based on the 2005 novel of the same name, author Patrick Neate brings modern-day noir City of Tiny Lights to the big screen with Dredd director Pete Travis at the helm, and hot commodity British star Riz Ahmed in the leading role as P.I.Tommy Akhtar. After a local escort visits him asking for his help, Tommy sets off on what...

Ghost in the Shell Review

Under tight wraps for months, Ghost In The Shell emerges into the daylight this week.  But does it give us an original take on the android theme, or something much more familiar? Clues that a film may not live up to the hype. Clue one: the film company don’t want any reviews to appear until the day it’s released. Clue...

Free Fire Review

British director Ben Wheatley has never shied away from controversy or dividing audiences.  Has he hit the target with his latest, Free Fire? Ben Wheatley likes his single locations.  First, there was a field (A Field In England), then a tower block (High-Rise) and now a disused warehouse in Free Fire, which was also the movie that closed the London...

Man Down Review

Headache inducing doesn’t give the right amount of credence to the complete and utter mess of Man Down. Man Down is a confusion infused collaboration between a leading man whose involvement seems unfathomably odd and a director whose direction seems to wander aimlessly looking for his purpose. With no coherent flow, Man Down follows Gabriel Drummer (Shia LaBeouf), a US Marine...

Don’t Knock Twice Review

It has become relatively normal to have low expectations for horror films. They’re the genre that suffers the most from an infamous lack of care and creativity. Luckily, this can lead to some grand surprises, but most of the time they end up being exactly what is anticipated. Don’t Knock Twice didn’t spark a feeling of promise based on its...

The Lost City of Z Review

Cerebral and oddly intoxicating James Gray’s adventure into one man’s life-long obsession for the Lost City of the Amazon he called Z, takes us on an almost trippy journey of British Explorer Percy Fawcett’s, at times, ridiculed and fateful mission to unearth his dream. The Lost City of Z is an adaptation of the novel from David Gann, but this...

Get Out Review

It’s not easy piecing together a thrilling horror which has very rarely been seen before, one that will have audiences beguiled by its mixture of humour, horror, political statements and a barrel load of suspense. Jordan Peele, in his directorial debut with Get Out, has broken out of his comedy corner and rustled up a dish of fresh, fun yet...

Beauty and the Beast Review

If there is one actress on this earth that has Disney princess screaming from her very being it’s Emma Watson, looking very much like the quintessential English rose with an enchanting demeanour and a 21st century twist there couldn’t be a better person to play Belle in Disney’s live-action Beauty and the Beast – even if her performance is...

Personal Shopper Review

When technology becomes a supporting role opposite Kristen Stewart in possible one of her best performances yet we get a thrilling, spooky and anxiety filled art-house classic that speaks directly to a modern society which could see a return to form for director Olivier Assayas. Personal Shopper isn’t a horror in the conventional sense but deals with the supernatural with...

Kong: Skull Island Review

Since 1933, the giant ape, Kong, has been the subject of at least seven movies either in an original storyline or via remakes including the last offering with Peter Jackson’s 2005 remake of the 1933 original, King Kong.  Whilst Jackson’s offering was not quite up to epic proportions, Kong: Skull Island only out ape’s it with its CGI battles...

FOLLOW FLAVOURMAG ONLINE

33,988FansLike
474,748FollowersFollow
13,372FollowersFollow
14,046FollowersFollow
3,759SubscribersSubscribe

YOU MAY HAVE MISSED!

MORE FASHION

What does Rita Ora, Megan Fox and Ginta Lapina have in...

Rita Ora, Megan Fox and Ginta Lapina all have something in common this month, they have all featured in stunning lingerie campaigns which have...

LATEST NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT

Tom Hardy, Beyonce, Jamie Dornan – Here’s the best 2018 celebrity...

2017 has been a cracking year for entertainment, movies, music and entertainment has been amazing and the celebrity calendars below feature some of the...
Already a fan? Never show again