Monday, May 10, 2021

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How To Build A Girl Review

How to Build A Girl

Caitlin Moran’s witty wordsmith wonder unleashes a whirlwind of ambitious thunder in Beanie Feldstein with a joyful trip to the 90s' sticking one finger up at sexist journalistic practices. Another of Caitlin Moran’s wordsmith wonders finds itself adapted in the name of Entertainment, at times semi-autobiographical, Beanie Feldstein’s Johanna takes a step into the 90s’ to unshackle the chains of...

Godmothered Review

Godmothered

A modern-day Elf for feminists, whilst enjoyable for its escapism, won’t be turning any frogs into princes any time soon. It wouldn’t be a festive period without the magic direct from the house of mouse and the promise of a “Disney Princess”. So teaming up with Bridget Jones Diary’s Sharon Maguire, expectations are high to bring home that feel-good nostalgia...

The Invisible Man Review

Leigh Whannell kicks off the re-envisioned Monster Universe with a hyper-intense modern-twist on a classic story. These days it’s not hard to trip over a reimagining, remake or whatever you want to call it at your local cinema.  Universal Pictures are taking advantage of their catalogue of classic monster movies and sprucing them up for modern-day audiences, the latest to...

Wonder Woman 1984 Review

Wonder Woman 1984

Never have we needed a blockbuster as much as we do right now in 2020!, Something big, bold and bloody explosive to break up the monotony some of us have had to sit through. There really is nothing like switching off with a big bag of popcorn and delving into the make-believe worlds that superheroes give us and hats...

Les Miserables Review

Les miserables

Ladj Ly's feature directorial debut clings to the provocative nature of La Haine with empathy and ferocity. It may have the same title as Victor Hugo’s infamous story, but this French drama, apart from being set in the same area of Paris as a section of his novel, is in no way yet another adaptation. Doused in timely themes of...

Tenet Review

Tenet

Christopher Nolan's mind-bending melting pot of confusion is a visually epic phenomenon, but its vagueness and headache-inducing storyline leave a sour taste. It’s the film that both Warner Bros and cinemas across the globe have pinned their hopes on to breathe life back into the pandemic hit planet earth. With Christopher Nolan’s insistence this needs to be seen on the...

The Beach Bum Review

McConnaughey goes deeply method in a sleazy hedonistic adventure of messy misadventure. Spring Breakers filmmaker, Harmony Korine returns to the big screen with the chameleon of acting Matthew McConnaughy. Korine yet again pushes buttons in a sleazy hedonistic adventure of responsibility in a haze of sunshine drenched beaches accompanied by sex, drugs and alcohol-fuelled irresponsibility.Anyone would assume McConnaughy’s Moondog is...

A Christmas Gift From Bob Review

A Christmas Gift From Bob

Four years on since that furry little bundle of joy, Bob, stole the nation’s hearts in A Street Cat Named Bob, he returns for this follow-up tear-jerker to fill all our hearts with a little festive spirit and to remind us all of the power of human kindness. In the film’s predecessor, based on the real-life story of James Bowen’s...

Uncle Frank Review

Uncle Frank

A drama full of mental turmoil, whilst having a bucket load of charm, threatened to drown in a subject just tad water-downed for mainstream audiences. Paul Bettany gets to flex his non-marvel acting chops in a coming-out drama during a time where anything other than heterosexuality in certain US states was more than frowned upon.Told via the narrative of Sophia...

The Forty-Year-Old Version Review

THE FORTY-YEAR-OLD VERSION

When life gives Radha Blank lemons, she makes lemonade and sticks two fingers up those who use age to stop you doing what makes you happy.  Middle-age sometimes sneaks up and smacks you right between the eyes without you even realising and makes you question, what exactly have I done with my life? That’s the exact inspiration behind Radha Blank’s...

Sometimes Always Never Review

Uniquely quirky but a long hard slog that is as dull as dishwater Sometimes things are never what they appear to be you may have the best vocabulary in the world but it’s not always easy to communicate with the ones you call Family. In Carl Hunter’s feature film debut a cunning wordsmith articulates his loss of a son by...

Mangrove Review – London Film Festival 2020

Mangrove Steve McQueen

Steve McQueen kicks of his Small Axe Anthology with a whirlwind force of nature, a poignant, eloquent and electrically charged hotbed of British stark reality of racial tension.  As the hotbed of racial tensions bubble over in the US and UK, filmmaker Steve McQueen’s first feature in the Small Axe anthology – which consists of five films – couldn’t feel...

One Night in Miami Review – London Film Festival 2020

One Night in Miami

Regina King makes her directorial debut with the latest in great black cinema, an adaptation of Kemp Powers' 2013 play marking a pivotal night in 1964. Lead by an eloquently laden dialogue-heavy storyline, its mere presence of its four leading men is nothing but mesmerizingly captivating.Set mainly in a hotel room after Cassius Clay aka Muhammad Ali (Eli Goree)...

Barb and Star Go To Vista Del Mar Review

Barb and Star go to Vista Del Mar

Teaming up for the first time since Bridesmaids, Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo not only star but co-wrote this shipwreck of overblown drivel. A catastrophic comedy that would have been best cut down to a 20-minute sketch show, just so we don’t have to sit through the pain of Jamie Dornan’s excessive musical numbers for one.If ridiculous is what...

We Summon the Darkness Review

Despite the title, there is nothing supernatural about this fluffy horror, just a bit of a murder spree of predictable boredom. You don’t have to look far for one of the most deceiving titles to hit feature films. You might expect a harrowing story of devil worshippers performing ritualistic routines to conjure up demon spawn for their own pleasure. What transpires...

Toy Story 4 Review

Woody and co will make you heartily smile in the heartfelt and wholesome fourth outing. For years, the Toy Story franchise has been a much-loved saga for audiences young and old. You would be forgiven for being slightly apprehensive in the arrival of a fourth instalment after nine years of being off the grid. Was it really a good idea...

Doctor Sleep Review

Stands on its own merits with a balancing act that stays faithful to the madness of The Shining but injects an air of horror mastery. Almost 40 years after Stanley Kubrick gave us his adaptation of Stephen King novel The Shining, filmmaker Mike Flanagan unleashes his sequel to the much–loved classic with Doctor Sleep.  Apprehension and expectation lay heavy amongst...

Joker Review

Phillips and Phoenix deliver a shattering and fresh new take on an age-old character, a character study of the birth of the supervillain with darkly disturbing vigour. “Put on a Happy Face” is the war cry for the invisible, the ones suffering from depression and the lonely outcasts of society who are simply classed as that just for being a...

Spies in Disguise Review

Pure, honest to god entertainment oozes out of every feel-good moment. Who knew Will Smith as a pigeon would be a winning formula? Troy Quane and Nick Bruno make their directorial debut with an animated Bond gone wrong. Pairing together the voices of big Willy himself, Will Smith, and the newest Spider-Man, Tom Holland for the long in development fun-sized...

Supernova Review – London Film Festival 2020

Supernova

British director, Harry MacQueen has melancholy on point, first with Hinterland, now with a beautiful and tender love story in which dementia dictates the rules and unearths truly flawless performances from both its leading men.The film follows Sam (Colin Firth) and Tusker (Stanley Tucci) as they take a road trip in their cosy little campervan over the visually stunning...

Yesterday Review

A foot-stomping joy that has a feel-good British film coursing through its veins. Danny Boyle and Richard Curtis are a dream filmmaking team, from Boyle, making the likes of Slumdog Millionaire and Trainspotting to Curtis’s Notting Hill and Love Actually (amongst many for both) the pair has great feel-good British film’s coursing through their veins. For their latest, the pair...

Last Christmas Review

Last Christmas movie review photo of actors

For all its unoriginality there is something inherently likeable in this fondue mess. ‘Tis the season to be jolly, well almost thanks to Bridesmaids and A Simple Favour filmmaker Paul Feig. Combining the much-loved back catalogue of George Michael and Wham, the wholly predictable and cheese-laden script - co-written by Emma Thompson - isn’t enough to make you have faith...

Sorry We Missed You Review

Ken Loach is back on his socialist horse three years after I, Daniel Blake hit right at the heart of austerity Britain. Once again he shouts loud for the working class grafters hit hard by poverty, trying to earn a living in a battered and divided country with relentless passion.The story focuses on one young family in a docu-soap...

Le Mans ’66 Review

Buckle up and enjoy the ride, this one comes with a complete full-service history that corners like it's on rails. Soaked in blood, sweat and greasy oil, James Mangold takes pole position in the latest of a long line of sporting films that will grip hold of the speed senses.  Based on the true story of Ford Vs. Ferrari in...

Aladdin Review

Filmmaker Guy Ritchie embarks on a whole new world in Disney’s latest live action remake of a movie that is close to the hearts of a whole generation of film fans. Delivering a film that isn’t as wholly terrible as you might have expected thanks to the charismatic charm of its leading cast. Reimaging Ron Clements and John Musker’s...

IT Chapter Two Review

A perfect casting can't defeat the curse of a repetitive narrative and an overzealous need for detail. Director Andy Muschietti is back to unfurl the second half of Stephen King’s classic novel, 27 years after the Loser’s club first encounter with the freakishly frightening clown of Derry, Pennywise. Even in adult form and problems of their own in their grown-up...

The Informer Review

Predictable cliché heaven but immensely thrilling, sucking you into every minute of the action. We’ve come to that point in the summer where blockbusters have more or less been and gone. Smaller budgeted films now get their chance to spend some time at the mid-year box office, director Andrea Di Stefano - who steps into the helm for his second...

Gemini Man Review

Sharply clinical action sequences and digital technical prowess fails to ignite the thrills. Filmmaker Ang Lee ventures into the digital de-ageing trend of modern cinema with this Will Smith offering, it’s a trend that comes with a fine line of balance to mix realistic visuals with a gripping and a well thought out script. Well, if you are hoping this...

Spider-Man: Far From Home Review

Breezy and light-hearted with some epic action pieces, it's a visual kaleidoscope that will send 'Peter Tingles' down your spine. Avengers: Endgame may seem like it has only just come and gone, closing out the infinity saga but Tom Holland’s Peter Parker aka Spider-man is back to tie up a few loose ends and mourn the passing of his mentor...

Onward Review

Tom Holland and Chris Pratt make for a killer combo in Pixar's latest tear-jerking animation that will have you ugly crying. Pixar’s fascination with death has certainly been a winner for the animation studio after its success of Coco and Inside Out. If it isn’t broken don’t fix it seems to be the order of the day as Tom Holland...