Monday, April 6, 2020

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50 Shades of Black Review – is it time for Wayans to give up is Parody Crown?

King of the parody, Marlon Wayans is back with his take on 50 Shades of Grey, 50 Shades of Black. Famed for his work with the Scary Movie franchise and White Chicks, you would expect a whole lot of silly foolishness from his script for this send-up. That’s exactly what you get but lacking is his ability to really...

Keanu Review

Little known in the UK Comedy Duo Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele has been making American audiences weep with laughter for years. Keanu see’s the duo break onto the big screen with the help of an adorable kitten named.... yes you guessed it Keanu. Everything about Keanu has cheese written all over it and it simply shouldn’t work as a...

The Sense of an Ending Review

With a title such as The Sense of an Ending, big expectations lay ahead, not even the greatest performances can make up for less than satisfying ending, building to a crescendo which forever hovers in the air never making that crashing descent of closure it so truly needs.With a screenplay adapted from Julian Barnes prize-winning novel of the same...

Embrace Review

With the phenomena of social media and the internet at the centre of global culture, it seems crucial that the discussion of body image is addressed. The conversation has actually been happening for a very long time, but without ever really managing to break the surface of the blanket of mass media that surrounds and dictates our lives every day....

Elvis & Nixon Review – Comically absurd tale which lacks gumption but has a certain charm.

Back in 1970, the King of Rock and Roll, Elvis Presley, posed for a picture with the then president of the United States, Richard Nixon in the presidential home of The White House and this is where the story begins for Elvis & Nixon. Elvis & Nixon proceeds to tell us one version of events that led up to this...

An Evening with Beverly Luff Lynn Review

Bizarre is quite an understatement for filmmaker Jim Hosking’s An Evening with Beverly Luff Lynn. The Greasy Strangler director has made insane his comfort zone, giving frat boy humour an edge of credibility with his latest which quite frankly takes bizarre originality and bewilderment to new levels.The story focuses on Lulu (Aubrey Plaza), a coffee shop worker, married to...

Free Fire Review

British director Ben Wheatley has never shied away from controversy or dividing audiences.  Has he hit the target with his latest, Free Fire? Ben Wheatley likes his single locations.  First, there was a field (A Field In England), then a tower block (High-Rise) and now a disused warehouse in Free Fire, which was also the movie that closed the London...

Spies in Disguise Review

Pure, honest to god entertainment oozes out of every feel-good moment. Who knew Will Smith as a pigeon would be a winning formula? Troy Quane and Nick Bruno make their directorial debut with an animated Bond gone wrong. Pairing together the voices of big Willy himself, Will Smith, and the newest Spider-Man, Tom Holland for the long in development fun-sized...

Cold Pursuit Review

Overacted and at times and patronising in it’s over explanation of its own jokes teeters on the edge of its enjoyability for the popcorn munchers. So much for Liam Neeson retiring from his bread and butter action film, the foot in mouth actor returns to the fold in a remake of the black comedy, In Order of Disappearance.  It’s kept...

Ant-Man and the Wasp Review

We may have barely just had the devastating Avengers: Infinity War but its tiniest superhero is back to typically break a few balls. By all means, this film is all about The Wasp while Ant-Man eagerly takes a well-deserved backseat. The title is misleading, where you are undoubtedly led to assume that Evangeline Lilly’s Wasp is the faithful sidekick, in fact, its Paul Rudd’s Ant-Man who fills this job nicely and the film is all the better for it.The film is sandwiched between Avengers: Civil War and Infinity War, Scott Laing (Paul...

The Light Between Oceans Review

M.L. Steadman’s novel The Light Between Oceans became an instant hit when published back in 2012, A classic romantic story set after the first world war which has a theme of deep rooted love, loyalty and the question of right and wrong playing on the moralistic values of an impossibly difficult situation. Writer and Director Derek Cianfrance – known for...

Suburra Review – Intense Mafia Crime Thriller Packs a Lethal Punch.

Once the heart of the Rome’s criminal world, Suburra holds many dark secrets, mainly never trust anyone to be completely what they may seem. Politicians, The Priesthood everyone has something sinister to hide. Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah Director, Stefano Sollima has a unique ability of bringing the Italian crime scene to life with extreme reality. In fact shooting for Suburra...

The Witch Review – Could this be the birth of a new and welcomed generation of scary movies?

The Witch takes subtle scares to a new high in this breathtakingly shot first feature film for writer and director Robert Eggers. Finally, we have a film creative that has moved away from the obvious nerve jumping moments and relied heavily on setting the right mood and anticipation for a horror which will truly unsettle the viewer. In Eggers The...

The Colony Review

1973 saw Chile in the midst of a Chilean Coup; under the leadership of the fascist regime of General Pinochet, the Chilean People were ready to take a stand. The Colony, which is based on true events, sets itself smack bang in the middle of this uprising with horrendous outcomes but does it try just a little too hard? The...

Money Monster Review – A Dancing Clooney leads us ridiculously to financial ruin.

With Money Monster being pitted as a tense thriller it’ certain that audiences are being duped into watching something it really isn’t. It’s a far cry for any intensity and the thrills are few and far between in a story which is somewhat predictable. Jodie Foster returns to the director’s chair with her fourth feature film in Money Monster with...

Early Man Review

Wallace and Gromit creators, Aardman and stalwart Nick Park come together yet again for a new claymation adventure with Early Man. This time the stop-motion geniuses take us on a historical tour to the Stoneage. Where our basic ancestors lacked the brain capacity of a pea but are still pitted against the European Bronze age creators in a battle of the beautiful game, Football.Jumping firmly on the 2018...

The Weekend Review

Films suffer from a lot of stereotyping, even more so in comedies. As you refine the genre and go from British comedies then focus on urban British comedies, it means there are fewer films on offer to break this practice. So when something comes along that seems to have really paid attention to how real young people act, behave, talk,...

A Quiet Passion Review

The last thing you would come to expect from a period biopic would be anything but quirky but Terence Davies, A Quiet Passion, the story of the 19th century American poet Emily Dickenson, revels in a slightly left of centre fascinating drama of a women trapped in an era that wasn’t quite ready for her individualism and feminine strength.If...

Okja Review

The Cannes audience may have booed Okja back in May, but they got it wrong. This story of a genetically modified porker is much more than another pig in the city.The Okja of the title is a pig, but this is no ordinary porker.  She’s the genetic creation of the Mirando Corporation – not to be confused with Monsanto...

Golden Years Review

When you mention Nick Knowles, script writer and executive producer of film doesn’t ultimately spring to mind. However, with Golden years, the DIY SOS presenter is exactly that and he hasn’t done too bad a job however even with a meagre budget it didn’t turn out too great either. Even behind the camera, in the Director’s chair, BAFTA award winning...