Monday, October 14, 2019

Movie Reviews

Home Movie Reviews

Norm of the North Review – An overwhelmingly dull animation that should have stayed on the cutting room floor.

As animations go, Norm of the North tries way too hard to be cute and fails miserable as it blunders its way to the end credits where at this point you’ll be gauging your eyes out and wishing for a quick death. Norm of the North is a cute talking Polar Bear (Voice of Rob Schneider), who at an early...

Black Panther Review

Since Ryan Coogler burst onto the scene with his debut, Fruitvale Station he has set the precedence in his affecting and hard-hitting storytelling; cementing his name as one to watch in delivering films that communicate to audiences who have rarely been given the chance to shine. It’s been a long time coming but Coogler’s POC cinematic revolution is finally upon us in Marvel’s Black Panther. Not just a celebration of black excellence in an arena...

20th Century Women Review

Growing older is inevitable.  But in the 1970s, 60 was a long way from being the new 40, as Annette Bening discovers in 20th Century Women.  Don’t be fooled by that epic-sounding title.  20th Century Women, the latest from writer/director Mike Mills, is anything but sweeping, offering up the story of three women in a crumbling South Californian house finding...

The Hard Stop Review

Back in 2011, the young life of Mark Duggan was taken at the hands of the police after a Hard Stop on the London roads of Tottenham, North London. This killing caused one of the biggest riots in British History fuelled by racist tension which dates back to at least 1985 after PC Blakelock was murdered on the Broadwater...

I, Daniel Blake Review

It’s not very often we are treated to a cinematic story that hits so close home. I, Daniel Blake hammer’s the nail right on the head off frustration with a fictional tale of one man being screwed over by the state with grim and anger inducing consequences. I, Daniel Blake – Which won this year’s Palme d'Or at the Cannes...

Journey’s End Review

RC’ Sheriff’s poignant war story has been adapted for the stage and film on numerous occasions over the years. In Saul Dibbs latest adaptation for the big screen, we are engulfed in a deeply affecting era of hope and despair on a personal and emotionally charged level. Stripping back to just the essentials and delving deep into the souls of those forced onto the front...

Framing John DeLorean Review

framing john delorean alex baldwin

A fascinating delve into a visionary dreamer. The DeLorean is more than just the time-travelling machine from ‘Back To The Future’, it was the lifelong dream of its very creator, John Z DeLorean. An American dreamer and lone-wolf who thought his vision could set him up for life. Part biopic, part documentary, directors Don Argott and Sheena M. Joyce take...

Green Room Review – Gruesomely Gripping and Brutal.

For only his second outing, Director Jeremy Saulnier has cranked up the heat in Green Room not only has he shown a flare for gruesome brutality but has landed the likes of legendary veteran actor Patrick Stewart along with Imogen Poots and Anton Yelchin to deliver a skinhead vs rockers horror that will shake you to your very core. The...

White Boy Rick Review

’71 Filmmaker, Yann Demange returns with only his second feature with what, on paper, could only be seen as make believe but the reality, this 80’s set crime drama of a teenager used and subsequently let down by the FBI is taken right out of real life. Demange has created two sides to this coin not just with the...

Yesterday Review

A foot-stomping joy that has a feel-good British film coursing through its veins. Danny Boyle and Richard Curtis are a dream filmmaking team, from Boyle, making the likes of Slumdog Millionaire and Trainspotting to Curtis’s Notting Hill and Love Actually (amongst many for both) the pair has great feel-good British film’s coursing through their veins. For their latest, the pair...

Born to be Blue Review

Born to be Blue adds its name to this year’s expanding list of biopics with a difference. This time looking at a period in the life of Jazz musician Chet Baker played here by an exceptional Ethan Hawke. It's Hawke’s performance that uplifts this story from what can be a very slow almost humdrum of a film. Following in slightly...

Birthday Review

Birthdays are generally synonymous with joy, celebration, and high spirits. And while writer and director, Chris King, titled his short film ‘Birthday’, the emotions at play are rather contrasting initially. Focusing on a young marine who gets severely wounded in combat, the 12 minute run time explores the immediate next steps in his life from hospital bed to physiotherapy with...

Bohemian Rhapsody Review

Marred by creative differences and challenges, Bryan Singer’s Bohemian Rhapsody has taken a few knocks to its iconic status. More a respectful nod to the Queen frontman, Freddie Mercury, than a band biopic, the anthem epic soaring renditions and the frivolous birth of iconic songs play out like a playful puppy than hard-hitting, in-depth drama. This one is unashamedly...

Marauders Review

In an ideal world, every movie would start with at least a wee spark of creativity.  But we don’t live in an ideal world – and, in case we need a reminder, there’s Marauders …… Working out where the original idea for the film came from is a thankless task because it looks more likely that there wasn’t one in the...

Sing Street Review – Charmingly Irish, Funny Musical Coming of Age Story.

Sing Street takes us on a musical journey of 80’s Dublin, almost like a biographical story of writer and director John Carney’s own youth, taking his inspiration from his own teenage years growing up in Dublin. Struggling with his own identity, it’s a heart-warming coming of age story. In Sing Street, Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) comes from a fairly well-off family...

I.T. Review

In a world that’s just seen a third series of technology horror anthology Black Mirror, it’s impossible not to compare thrillers with the same theme to the standard which the show has created, which is a test Pierce Brosnan-starring film I.T.  must also face. Despite the challenging circumstances, I.T is overall a surprisingly worthy action-thriller centred around the idea of...

Ant-Man and the Wasp Review

We may have barely just had the devastating Avengers: Infinity War but its tiniest superhero is back to typically break a few balls. By all means, this film is all about The Wasp while Ant-Man eagerly takes a well-deserved backseat. The title is misleading, where you are undoubtedly led to assume that Evangeline Lilly’s Wasp is the faithful sidekick, in fact, its Paul Rudd’s Ant-Man who fills this job nicely and the film is all the better for it.The film is sandwiched between Avengers: Civil War and Infinity War, Scott Laing (Paul...

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Review

The a-holes are back with a big bang of colour and euphoric family bickering that falters with a little whimper, riding the tails of the first in order to make Vol. 2 an eggtastic success with the scene-stealing baby Groot and an emotionally touching shocker that tugs lightly at the heart strings as well as taking you by surprise.If...

Ma Ma Review – Quirky Melodrama of Life, Death and True Love.

Penelope Cruz takes center stage in Ma Ma, a story which focuses on one woman fighting a brave battle with Breast Cancer almost on her own. Ma Ma takes a Cruz and strips her of her voluptuous and stunning image to show a more vulnerable and laid bare yet beautiful woman. Ma Ma may be written and directed by Julio...

Aladdin Review

Filmmaker Guy Ritchie embarks on a whole new world in Disney’s latest live action remake of a movie that is close to the hearts of a whole generation of film fans. Delivering a film that isn’t as wholly terrible as you might have expected thanks to the charismatic charm of its leading cast. Reimaging Ron Clements and John Musker’s...

Free Fire Review

British director Ben Wheatley has never shied away from controversy or dividing audiences.  Has he hit the target with his latest, Free Fire? Ben Wheatley likes his single locations.  First, there was a field (A Field In England), then a tower block (High-Rise) and now a disused warehouse in Free Fire, which was also the movie that closed the London...

Miles Ahead Review – A totally chaotic experience of phenomenal acting.

Miles Ahead isn’t quite the bio-pic on the life of Miles Davis you may be expecting from the first-time director Don Cheadle - the story is only inspired from certain moments from the legendary Jazz Musicians life but that doesn’t mean this is any the less intriguing. Don Cheadle not only don’s the director's hat for his directorial debut for...

Creed Review – Can the Next Generation go back to its Roots?

In Creed, we have a new chapter of the Rocky franchise, a time to make way for the next generation in the form of Apollo Creed’s son, Adonis. One question we may ask ourselves, do we really need another instalment to ruin the memory of this cult classic? The late World heavyweight Champion, Apollo Creed, had an affair before he...

Early Man Review

Wallace and Gromit creators, Aardman and stalwart Nick Park come together yet again for a new claymation adventure with Early Man. This time the stop-motion geniuses take us on a historical tour to the Stoneage. Where our basic ancestors lacked the brain capacity of a pea but are still pitted against the European Bronze age creators in a battle of the beautiful game, Football.Jumping firmly on the 2018...

The Christmas Chronicles Review

Christmas is well and truly on its way.... if you weren’t aware, Netflix will certainly remind you with the slurry of festive fare. Whilst, most are slushy mush that doesn’t even have the energy to entertain your lazy Sunday afternoons, its latest unwittingly Sexy Santa Kurt Russell is about to shake up your dull ol’ sprouts.The story centres on...

Hidden Figures Review

Whilst most may be aware of the role of importance men played in sending a man into space to lay his feet firmly on the moon, not so many know of the tremendous work of the African-American Women who played an equally important role in achieving it. Hidden Figures delves, with a delicate touch, into the story of three...

Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazar’s Revenge Review

The Pirates Of The Caribbean franchise reaches number five with Salazar’s Revenge.  But is it time for the ol’ heave-ho, me hearties?Hang on!  Wasn’t this supposed to be called Dead Men Tell No Tales?  Yes, it was, and it still is in the States – and the line’s included in the film – but, in their infinite wisdom, Disney...

Cafe Society Review

So very typically Woody Allen, Cafe Society has that demure and romanticised imagery of elegance and grace of 1930’s Hollywood and New York. Lavished in the fascination of the middle class with lashings of opulence, but this vintage Allen lacks the substance to maintain its beauty. Written, directed and narrated by the soft slow tones of Allen, Cafe Society has...

Detective Pikachu Review

Pays service to the Pokémon fan base but it's Ryan Reynolds Pikachu that injects the fun. If you’ve been living under a rock for the past twenty odd years, the latest big screen incarnation of the Pokémon phenomenon could wash right over your head. Over the years a number of films and TV shows have tried to give life to...

IT Chapter Two Review

A perfect casting can't defeat the curse of a repetitive narrative and an overzealous need for detail. Director Andy Muschietti is back to unfurl the second half of Stephen King’s classic novel, 27 years after the Loser’s club first encounter with the freakishly frightening clown of Derry, Pennywise. Even in adult form and problems of their own in their grown-up...